1-800-826-6332

  International: 251-633-5704

Understanding Pressure

September 20th, 2010

Have you ever gone through the complete sublimation process onto your chosen product and upon removing the sublimation paper seen “light and dark” places on the intended “master piece”? If so, then you are a victim of “bad pressure”. You may be wondering how to determine the correct pressure for sublimating to Condé products. I have a sure method for determining that. First, you must know some general information about the product you are transferring too. Is the surface smooth? Is the substrate flat, rigid, or curved on the edges? Does the surface have textured areas? What are the layers? Finally, you need to understand the pressure settings on your heat press.

To share my understanding of pressure for sublimation, I can best explain it as “equal distribution of weight / pressure” or “good contact”. Basically, when the press is closed the transfer should be equally dispersed among the entire sublimatable area of the substrate. Prospray and Tape can be helpful for adhering accurate image placement onto the substrate but not evenly transferring the image to the substrate.

Manual presses:

Light Pressure = 1 hand; Closing the press with one hand, (ex: t-shirts).

Medium Pressure = 1 ½ hand; Closing the press requires one hand with help from the other hand.

Heavy Pressure = 2 hands; Closing the press requires both hands.

Very Heavy Pressure = 2 plus some shoulder strength. Closing the press requires both hands and some body weight.

In general, most Condé products are safely transferred to with medium pressure. This would include products that are flat and do not have surface texture or ridges. For example, metals and FRP products are easy in the sense that they do not require layers (ex: felt, nomax, or a heat conductive rubber pad). When sublimating to textured surfaces, usually they are pressed face down and may require medium to heavy pressure to better mesh to the sublimatable area (ex: light switches, slate and neoprene). On occasion there are times very heavy pressure will be required. Very heavy pressure is necessary for sublimating to hard to reach areas that are otherwise left exposed from good contact with the transfer (ex: patches).

Don’t let yourself fall victim of “bad pressure”. Follow these simple guidelines for adjusting pressure and eliminating future product waste. Should you have more questions about sublimation instructions, visit www.conde.com , and then click on “support” where you can download our complete guide for “Sublimation Instructions”. Second, take a tour on www.condetv.com and type key words for videos on sublimating to any of our products.

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Conde Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


Networking your Ricoh printer for sublimation printing

September 16th, 2010

Ever find yourself in a situation where you have more than one computer that you need to have installed to print to a single printer? When this happens you have a choice to make. You can install the printer on one computer and share it over your network or you can connect the printer to your network and install it directly to each computer through your network.  Condé’s DyeTrans Ricoh printers have the capability for either method. The Ricoh GXe3300n comes with a standard network port on the back of the printer that you can plug directly into your router and then configure for network printing.

The GX7000 has an optional network adaptor that installs on the printer to make it ready to connect and configure. Let’s take a moment to talk about the advantages and disadvantages of each. 

 VS  

Using the shared method you have the                  With the networked method you 

capability of monitoring all your print                      are printing directly to the printer

jobs from the computer that the printer                  without relying on another computer.

is connected to. One major disadvantage                 Also if you have a wireless network

is in the fact that the computer that the                   you just have to connect the printer

printer is attached to will be using it’s                       directly to the router and then any

resources to print your documents. This                  computer on the network can print to

can cause that computer to run slow                         the printer weather it is wired or

and sluggish.                                                                  wireless.

            We at Condé feel it is better to connect your printer to your network and not through another computer. This is easy to setup and we not only have a document and a video that will show you how to do this but we are always happy to help our customers with this or anything else you might need.

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,

Conde Systems Inc.

www.conde.com

Technical Support

1-800-826-6332

Andy Taylor


Condé Introduces Mesh Knit Shorts For Sublimation Transfer

September 8th, 2010

Mobile, AL – September 7, 2010 – Condé™ Systems, Inc. has added white and gray mesh knit shorts to its DyeTrans™ family of sublimatable products. At home or the gym, these full cut, basketball style shorts with interwoven moisture wicking technology are a cool and comfortable addition to the existing line of sublimatable t-shirts and sweatshirts. Utilizing dye-sub technology, the shorts can be easily decorated with photographic quality images and unique designs – providing customers a more colorful and versatile option to standard screen printed or heat applied letters and numbers. The possibilities are endless and the sublimation process doesn’t change the “feel” of the fabric. The imprintable shorts are available in adult sizes S-M-L-XL-XXL and feature a covered elastic waistband with drawstring and double-needle bottom hem. Visit www.conde.com for additional information.

With an emphasis on dye sublimation technology and the sublimation transfer process, Condé Systems has become the recognized leader in the personalized products market by offering everything needed to get into the photo gift business including transfer systems, production software, blank imprintables, transfer paper and supplies, and instructional videos. Screen printers, sign makers, embroiderers, pad printers, engravers, photographers, artists, and home business entrepreneurs can expand their current product offerings by providing their customers full-color, photographic quality gifts and awards. During all stages of product selection, sales, and post sales, Condé offers expert knowledge and superior customer support. Condé and DyeTrans are trademarks of Condé Systems, Inc. Other brands and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders.


Unisub Hardboard Tile Mural

August 29th, 2010

Using a George Knight® DK20S™ Heat Press, Condé’s David Gross demonstrates the procedures for applying dye sublimation transfers to 12″ hardboard tiles and creating a wall mural. The mural design by Conde’s Todd Till. The part number for these tiles is U5698 at http://www.conde.com. The transfers are created using a Ricoh® GX7000 printer with Sawgrass® SubliJet-R™ sublimation inks on TexPrint-R® Sublimation Paper, with a George Knight™ heat press. All products are available from conde.com, including the George Knight® DK20S™ heat press used in the demo.


Explore digital garment decoration firsthand at the SGIA Expo

August 12th, 2010

Fairfax, Virginia – Discover the latest innovations in digital garment technology at the Digital Apparel Production Zone during the 2010 SGIA Expo (Las Vegas, October 13-15). Staffed by industry experts, this sales-free Expert Advice Zone features hands-on demonstrations of digital applications for the garment decorating community.

“There will be real workflow examples in the Digital Apparel Production Zone this year, which is new for 2010,” said Zone participant Christopher Bernat of Vapor Apparel. “Several new products will be making their North American debut, and the direct-to-garment platforms will be printing a `shoot out’ graphic so people can judge the different options apples-to-apples.”

At this popular Zone, you’ll identify solutions to fit your needs, get answers about profit models and pricing, and learn tricks to prevent errors and enhance accuracy. It’s the perfect opportunity to connect with industry experts and experience live demonstrations of various technologies, including: Dye sublimation, direct-to-garment inkjet, heat-applied vinyl and print and cut vinyl.

See these companies currently scheduled to participate in the Zone:
-All American Manufacturing and Supply Co.
-AnaJet Inc
-Axiom America
-Belquette, Inc.
-Brother International Corporation
-Coldenhove Papier BV
-Condé Systems, Inc.
-Delta Apparel
-Gans Ink and Supply Co.
-Geo Knight & Co
-Graphics One
-HIX Corporation
-Insta Graphic Systems
-Lawson Screen & Digital Products, Inc.
-The M&R Companies
-MESA Distributors Inc
-Next Wave Media Solutions
-Roland DGA Corporation
-Stahls’ ID Direct
-Vapor Apparel

In addition to the Digital Apparel Production Zone, SGIA will offer other sales-free Expert Advice Zones at the Expo, tailored to each of the diverse specialty imaging communities.


David Gross’s Tip #13: Recycling Your Printer’s Ink Tank

June 25th, 2010

Condé’s David Gross talks about his favorite tips for the sublimation business operator. Here is with Tip #13: Recycling Your Printer’s Ink Tank. Check out http;//www.conde.com for more tips and business supplies for dye sublimation and heat transfer imprinting.


Adding Dye Sub Images to iPad Neoprene Case

June 21st, 2010

Using a George Knight® DK20™ Heat Press, Condé’s Brittany Anderson demonstrates the procedures for applying dye sublimation transfers to a Neoprene® iPad™ case. The part number for this case is MP032 at http://www.conde.com. The transfers are created using a Ricoh® GX7000 printer with Sawgrass® SubliJet-R™ sublimation inks on TexPrint-R® Sublimation Paper, with a George Knight™ heat press. All products are available from conde.com, including the George Knight® DK20™ heat press used in the demo.


Travel Pillow Decoration with Dye Sublimation

June 14th, 2010

Using a George Knight® DK20™ Heat Press, Condé’s Brittany Anderson demonstrates the procedures for applying dye sublimation transfers to a DyeTrans™ travel pillow. We suggest that you lint roll all fabric items.The part number for these pillowcases is 5002 at http://www.conde.com. The transfers are created using a Ricoh® GX7000 printer with Sawgrass® SubliJet-R™ sublimation inks on TexPrint-R® Sublimation Paper, with a George Knight™ heat press. All products are available from conde.com, including the George Knight® DK20™ heat press used in the demo.


# 6 Sublimation Business Tip with Condé’s David Gross

June 14th, 2010

Condé’s David Gross talks about his favorite tips for the sublimator. Look for his article in the Sublimation Almanac. Here he is with Tip #6: Have a Back Up Plan! Check out http;//www.conde.com for more tips and business supplies for dye sublimation and heat transfer imprinting. Conde’s instructions for sublimation are available for free to our clients at conde.com/support in Condé’s PartnerNet area.


Dye sub transfers – Vapor® SubliThrow™ throw blanket

June 14th, 2010

Using a George Knight® DK20™ Heat Press, Condé’s Brittany Anderson demonstrates the procedures for applying dye sublimation transfers to a Vapor® SubliThrow™ throw blanket. The part number for these tiles is THROW9 at http://www.conde.com. The transfers are created using a Ricoh® GX7000 printer with Sawgrass® SubliJet-R™ sublimation inks on TexPrint-R® Sublimation Paper, with a George Knight™ heat press. All products are available from conde.com, including the George Knight® DK20™ heat press used in the demo.