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Sublimation or Transfer Papers

October 19th, 2010

I get several calls where people are asking me what sublimation instructions to use for cotton shirts.  The correct answer here is that you cannot sublimate to cotton, however a lot of times what they are really asking for is the procedure to using a transfer paper to press to cotton. This is a common miscommunication and when I hear it I usually don’t try to correct the customer.  I just give them the directions for the transfer papers. That way they get the results they are looking and everyone is happy. Terminology is not a big deal to me as long as the customer gets what they need!

Every so often I will hear a customer who actually is printing on transfer papers with sublimation inks. This is a bad idea. Will it work? Probably. You can use duct tape to patch a hole in your jeans but do you really want to?

Transfer papers use an emulsion layer on top of the inks (or toner) to adhere the image to the final product. With sublimation the ink actually goes from a solid form (print out) to a gas form and moves into the substrate. When the material cools it then transforms back to a solid in effect dying substrate.

Condé offers a variety of transfer papers. Each one is designed for specific applications.  Each in turn comes with different procedures, times, temperatures and pressures. The addition of sublimation ink only complicates things. Not only do you have the possibility of the ink actually trying to sublimate during the press but you also have to worry about how the sublimation ink is going to bond to the emulsion layer of the paper. You may even get a great product but it will most likely fade in as little as a few days.

Check out transfer papers on www.conde.com for more information about our transfer papers as well as procedures for how to use them.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Condé Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Andy Taylor


What is Dye Sublimation?

October 15th, 2010

I hear this question a lot both from people calling who are interested in starting their own business and from friends who are just curious about what I do. I even remember asking that question when I first came to work for Condé. Most of the customers I talk to do not fully understand what dye sublimation is. Not to mention the customers that are just getting started in it that do not really understand it at all. If you have a question or need to understand something PLEASE give us a call.

In a nutshell dye sublimation is a process in which the ink converts directly from a solid to a gas from the heat of the press. The gas then transfers from the paper to your substrate. Once the substrate cools your image will have moved from the paper to the final product.

Dye sublimation requires a special ink. Condé sells several printers from both Epson and Ricoh that can be used for sublimation. You cannot use the standard inks that come with the printer. There are several different types of sublimation inks. Each printer has a specific ink or a list of inks that will work with that printer for sublimation. 

Hard substrates such as ceramic, metals and hardboards require a special coating for sublimation. You can’t just pick up tiles at your local hardware store! Polyester does not require a coating however cotton fibers will not accept the sublimation inks. When pressing to fabrics I do highly recommend 100% polyester!

The temperature, pressure and time are all important factors as well. Different substrates heat up at different rates and have very different characteristics. Condé has a lab that tests each item we sell before it is released to the customer. We have ironed out the kinks and have developed a set of instructions that will give you the specific instructions for each item. Our technical support department will also be glad to help our customers with any questions or problems you might have when sublimating.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Condé Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Andy Taylor


Using the Foam Kit and the Teflon Pillow

September 30th, 2010

Clients who sublimate to textile can find this product to be a worthy investment. Here is why: Have you ever sublimated to a t-shirt, raised the press, removed the transfer and found “paper indention’s” indicating the edges of the paper from the heat and pressure during the transfer process? This is unavoidable if you do not use either the foam kit or the Teflon pillow and develop a understanding of how to correctly transfer with these products included in the layers.

Not to mention, those of you who have just given up and excepted the paper lines on fabrics because you thought there is just nothing you can do to remedy this situation. Or, some of you may have purchased all the “bells and whistles” that were recommended for apparel, tried it and still seen the paper creases after sublimating. That’s even more frustrating because there is more invested to produce a flawless product. Maybe I can help change your mind and perfect the end results.

I have seen these lines in my own work and with the appropriate settings we can reduced the visible creases. Even though the teflon pillow is the easiest to maneuver some people have said that the foam kit is the best because it is the softest. With fabrics the softer the better for “meshing”. I will explain:

The adjustment is the same if using the foam or pillow:

  1. Lay either item on the bottom platinum of the press
  2. With no pressure applied at this time, close the press
  3. Get “eye level” with the gap so you can see the edge of the foam between the plates of the closed press.
  4. Turn the dial, closing the gap 9increasing the pressure) until the foam or pillow is compress about ¼ of its’ height.
  5. Lock it in and raise the press. Now introduce our sublimation instructions and the layers and press away.

You can have success by including these layers in your sublimation process if you understand what to do once you have the foam kit and / or teflon pillow in hand and a some guidance about on how to use it. Conde Technicians wants to get the word out on products like these so that they earn there worth. If you have any questions about this or other products give us a call and we will help to get you informed so that you are getting your monies worth from all purchases.

Video:

Using Vapor Foam

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Conde Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


Condé Systems is doing it again!

September 29th, 2010

It’s time to show off your creativity! Participate in our Hanging Mural Contest! Show off your design and see what others are doing with the exciting new Wavy Tile Murals. You guys and gals who took part in the Flip Flop Contest did such an awesome job, we just had to go and do it again. For inspiration, we have anteed up another Apple 16GB iPad for the 1st place winner; 2nd place prize a $200 account credit; 3rd place prize a $100 account credit. To support contestants I have just uploaded all our mural templates for these fun new products. Last, I offer some product perceptiveness and brainstorming ideas to get you going.

Time is money…

You might be thinking, “How do I create a way to use my image in a mural? Where do I begin?” Well, you asked and we answer. Like with all Condé templates, videos, etc…, our goal in support is to create and execute ways that make your job easy and help clients become more productive. Having already created the mural templates in both CorelDraw and Photoshop I have eliminated a lot of the work. Our templates provide the ability to power clip your selected image into the template, print and go. It’s just that easy!

How the product works…

We have already provided instructions for how to sublimate onto the tiles in the “Sublimation Instruction” cookbook on PartnerNet. For those who prefer to watch Britney guide you through our product sublimation process step-by-step, you will find the video for sublimating onto wavy tile murals already online. The assembly of the mural is quick and easy. It includes the rod, “C” rings (no crimping required) and ready to hang tiles in a verity of lengths and widths, (2 across, 3 across, and 4 across. The length is optional.). If it’s the design you concerned with, then call or shoot us an email, we have lots of ideas for that too.

We can’t wait to see our clients at work with their ideas and designs. We get excited about helping to get you motivated with our sublimation products. Like I said before, by using the product templates and instructional videos “we have eliminated a lot of the work”. No excuses… grab your best design ideas and let’s get started on winning a prize! It’s a win win!

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Conde Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


Clearing Error 990 and 999 on Ricoh DyeSub Systems

September 16th, 2010

There is not much that I despise more than car trouble. At some point, each of us will get into our automobiles and turn the ignition only to discover it will not start. Despite all our preventive maintenance efforts this can happen to anyone of us. I don’t know about you but without my wheels I am literally “out of business”.

If you own a Ricoh Printer there may come a time when the printer will display a 990 or a 999 error. If this should happen to your Ricoh system, Condé Technicians offers helpful perception to a speedy recovery. I will begin with a little “Ricoh” history about this error.

“ERR (990) or ERR (999) are both error messages which are displayed when a sensor does not work normally due to dirtiness. For example, either may be caused by a dirty maintenance unit or clogged ink nozzles. It may be possible to resolve the issue by cleaning the device as described below

To clean your device, follow these steps.

  1. Turn off the main power switch.

2.     Open the top cover.

Take care not to snag the sleeves of your clothing on the cord (1). Do not touch the feed belt (2).



3.     Clean the part indicated in the image below using a damp cloth or cotton tipped applicator.

Never use tissues because it can contaminate the maintenance unit with loose fibers.

  1. Close the top cover.
  1. Turn on the main power switch.
  1. Print the nozzle check pattern and check that the nozzles are not clogged.

If the problem persists, contact your local authorized service/support representative.”

These visuals are great tutorials, but the support staff here at Condé Systems Inc.  (www.conde.com) has taken your questions about this error quite literal. Conde Support Technicians has accumulated understanding for remedying this error and get you “Back to Business”. If you see this error, visit www.condetv for our timely video, “Cleaning the Capping Station on the Ricoh” and let us get you back to business.

http://www.youtube.com/condesystems#p/search/0/NGsGP8cZeAI)

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,

Conde Systems Inc.

www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician

1-800-826-6332

Vicky Waldrop


Condé Introduces Mesh Knit Shorts For Sublimation Transfer

September 8th, 2010

Mobile, AL – September 7, 2010 – Condé™ Systems, Inc. has added white and gray mesh knit shorts to its DyeTrans™ family of sublimatable products. At home or the gym, these full cut, basketball style shorts with interwoven moisture wicking technology are a cool and comfortable addition to the existing line of sublimatable t-shirts and sweatshirts. Utilizing dye-sub technology, the shorts can be easily decorated with photographic quality images and unique designs – providing customers a more colorful and versatile option to standard screen printed or heat applied letters and numbers. The possibilities are endless and the sublimation process doesn’t change the “feel” of the fabric. The imprintable shorts are available in adult sizes S-M-L-XL-XXL and feature a covered elastic waistband with drawstring and double-needle bottom hem. Visit www.conde.com for additional information.

With an emphasis on dye sublimation technology and the sublimation transfer process, Condé Systems has become the recognized leader in the personalized products market by offering everything needed to get into the photo gift business including transfer systems, production software, blank imprintables, transfer paper and supplies, and instructional videos. Screen printers, sign makers, embroiderers, pad printers, engravers, photographers, artists, and home business entrepreneurs can expand their current product offerings by providing their customers full-color, photographic quality gifts and awards. During all stages of product selection, sales, and post sales, Condé offers expert knowledge and superior customer support. Condé and DyeTrans are trademarks of Condé Systems, Inc. Other brands and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders.


Adding Sublimation Transfers to a Bottle Hugger

August 29th, 2010

Using a George Knight® DK20™ Heat Press, Condé’s David Gross demonstrates the procedures for applying dye sublimation transfers the new zippered bottle holder beverage insulator. The part number for these huggers is HUG5 at http://www.conde.com. The transfers are created using a Ricoh® GX7000 printer with Sawgrass® SubliJet-R™ sublimation inks on TexPrint-R® Sublimation Paper, with a George Knight™ heat press. All products are available from conde.com, including the George Knight® DK20S™ heat press used in the demo.


Sublimating a Vapor Polyester Shirt Using a Foam Kit

August 29th, 2010

Using a George Knight® DK20S™ Heat Press, Condé’s David Gross demonstrates the procedures for applying dye sublimation transfers to polyester shirts. The part number for these Safety Yellow Shirts is 4055 at http://www.conde.com. The transfers are created using a Ricoh® GX7000 printer with Sawgrass® SubliJet-R™ sublimation inks on TexPrint-R® Sublimation Paper, with a George Knight™ heat press. The Vapor® Foam Kit (FOAMKIT) is used to eliminate creases. All products are available from conde.com, including the George Knight® DK20™ heat press used in the demo.


Unisub Hardboard Tile Mural

August 29th, 2010

Using a George Knight® DK20S™ Heat Press, Condé’s David Gross demonstrates the procedures for applying dye sublimation transfers to 12″ hardboard tiles and creating a wall mural. The mural design by Conde’s Todd Till. The part number for these tiles is U5698 at http://www.conde.com. The transfers are created using a Ricoh® GX7000 printer with Sawgrass® SubliJet-R™ sublimation inks on TexPrint-R® Sublimation Paper, with a George Knight™ heat press. All products are available from conde.com, including the George Knight® DK20S™ heat press used in the demo.


Sublimating Glass Cutting Boards

July 13th, 2010

Using a George Knight® DK20™ Heat Press, Condé’s Brittany Anderson demonstrates the procedures for applying dye sublimation transfers to Condé’s glass cutting boards. The part number for these boards is 4005, 4017, 4018, 4019, CB714 and GCB005 at http://www.conde.com. The transfers are created using a Ricoh® GX7000 printer with Sawgrass® SubliJet-R™ sublimation inks on TexPrint-R® Sublimation Paper, with a George Knight™ heat press. All products are available from conde.com, including the George Knight® DK20™ heat press used in the demo.