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Changing the order of objects

March 18th, 2012

Arranging the order of objects in CorelDraw

If you have ever started a design and decided later that the last object you created or brought into the graphic you really need it to be somewhere in between some other objects within the graphic. If you have spent hours working with that document then you wouldn’t want to spent a lot of time trying to work around the dilemma.

From CorelDraw, you can change the stacking order of objects on a layer or a page by sending objects to the front or back, or behind or in front, of other objects. You can also position objects precisely in the stacking order, as well as reverse the stacking order of multiple objects.

Here is how:

1. Select the object

2. Click “Arrange” from the menu

3. At this point you can arrange “back one’; “forward one”; “all the way to the back”; “all the way to the front”.

An object cannot be moved to a locked (non-editable) layer; instead, it is moved to the closest normal or editable layer. For example, when you apply the To front of page command, and the topmost layer is locked, the object is moved to the topmost editable layer. Any objects on the locked layer remain in front of the object.

By default, all objects on the master page appear on top of the objects on other pages.

An Order command is unavailable if the selected object is already positioned in the specified stacking order. For example, the To front of page command is unavailable if the object is already in front of all the other objects on the page.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, the Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Senior Technical Consultant,

Vicky Waldrop


How to Apply a mesh to an object in CorelDraw

February 17th, 2012

For those who like to create vector images and blend color into and object, I have a great tool for you to learn and have some fun with. The “Mesh Tool in CorelDraw id an awesome way to create colorful drawings and transition color into something very artistic. People will ask how you did it. I use this tool with flowers and for creating a more 3D effect with some graphics. I hope you find this tool as useful as I do. Here is how…

To apply a mesh fill to an object:
1.

Select an object.

2.
In the toolbox, click the Mesh fill tool .
3.
Type the number of columns in the top portion of the Grid size box on the property bar.
4.
Type the number of rows in the bottom portion of the Grid size box on the property bar, and press Enter.
5.
Adjust the grid nodes on the object.
You can also
Add an intersection
Click once within a grid, and click the Add intersection button on the property bar.
Add a node
Hold down Shift, and double-click where you want to add the node.
Remove a node or an intersection
Click a node, and click the Delete node(s) button on the property bar.
Shape the mesh fill
Drag a node to a new location.
Remove the mesh fill
Click the Clear mesh button on the property bar.
If the mesh object contains color, adjusting the intersection nodes of the mesh affects how the colors blend together.
You can also marquee select or freehand marquee select nodes to shape an entire area of the mesh. To marquee select nodes, choose Rectangular from the Selection mode list box, and drag around the nodes you want to select. To freehand select nodes, choose Freehand from the Selection mode list box, and drag around the nodes you want to select. Holding down Alt while dragging lets you toggle between the Rectangular and Freehand selection mode.
You can add an intersection by double-clicking in a space, or you can add a single line by double-clicking a line.
To add color to a patch in a mesh fill
1.
Select a mesh-filled object.
2.
In the toolbox, click the Mesh fill tool .
.
Drag a color from the color palette to a patch in the object.
You can also
Color an intersection node in a mesh fill
Click an intersection node, and click a color on the color palette.
Mix a color in a mesh fill Select part of the mesh, press Ctrl, and click a color on the color palette.
You can also drag a color from the color palette to an intersection node.

You can also marquee select or freehand marquee select nodes to apply a color to an entire area of the mesh. To marquee select nodes, choose Rectangular from the Selection mode list box on the property bar, and drag around the nodes you want to select. To freehand select nodes, choose Freehand from the Selection mode list box on the property bar, and drag around the nodes you want to select. Holding down Alt while dragging lets you toggle between the Rectangular and Freehand selection mode.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, the Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Senior Technical Consultant,

Vicky Waldrop


Using Felt with Condé Products

February 3rd, 2012

When I am asked how and when felt should be used, I have to include the rules of pressure and the types of products you have to transfer onto. For instance if you are pressing to a textured surface or some other uneven surface like tile or something with an easel on the

Using felt to create a meshing effect

back you cant exactly close the press evenly. So to accomplish an even surface where the top platen touches the sublimatable area, you must have something in between the hard surfaces to create a meshing effect. When this occurs the felt is needed.

With the right amount of pressure applied by the press the product will mesh into the softness of the felt and allow some resistance for the top surface to adjust to the flatness of the top platen. Therefore, creating equal distribution across the sublimatable area.

Felt is most often used on the bottom of the press just above the bottom platen and Teflon sheet. The felt is then applied and cover with protective paper to prevent ink from transferring onto the your reusable products that are more costly if replaced.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, the Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Senior Technical Consultant,

Vicky Waldrop


Experimenting with various times.

February 3rd, 2012

Often we have calls about what time to use when the Condé instructions call for a window of time (ex:6-8 mins.), The time variation is  due to differences in the equipment. I will try to explain what I mean by an equipment variation. Mug presses have have different amps. The higher the amps the hotter the press can get. Low amps can have lower temperatures. This will cause time variations based on the equipment you are using. Thus, causing variations in color or should I say the finished product. I have a simple solution for finding your time based on your press.

Here is How:

From your digital imaging application create four black boxes small enough to fit on one of the products in test. It is always recommended to purchase a couple of additional products for beta testing on your end.

Using one of the additional products you would have purchased for testing, and various times, sublimate one box at a time allow a cooling period between each of the four transfers. For example refer to the image on the right: Cut out each box and transfer each separately using the different instructions within the individual boxes. At the end of the test you will have four black boxes on one product and within those boxes the different instructions your used for press times. After reviewing, determine the better of the four colors and make a note of which one provides the best result. That is your time and instruction!

I also recommend keeping a notebook of any and all instructions so that you can revisit them for future pressings with that particular product. This will save time and we all know time is money. Not to mention the bad product you will eliminate from your “wall of shame”.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, the Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Senior Technical Consultant,

Vicky Waldrop


Printing to the ByPass Tray by Default Settings

October 29th, 2011

There are those folks out there that desire to do a sheet feed using only the By-pass tray on the Gx7000 of the GXe3300N Ricoh printers. It is not required or useful for those people who use standard paper sizes on a regular bases but would come in handy for those who are constantly changes paper sizes and for those who use unusual paper sizes or unique papers outside of the ordinary settings.

Purposes:

Generally, those who choose to use the by-pass tray as their default setting will either be be using a variety of paper sizes, a variety of paper types, unique paper settings or strictly the use of large media (ex: 13x 19). It would be to time consuming to use tray one or tray two as their default because of the media types or sizes. It is much easier for these folks to load or sheet feed than to continuously change paper in the tray.

How to:

Defaulting the By-Pass tray is a custom setting from the within the driver. It would be mandatory to create a setting by changing the tray source setting to the “by-pass tray” and saving it that way. here is how…

Go to your printer folder:

start

control panel

printers faxes or devices and printers

Select Media Type and Tray Source (By-Pass)

right click on the Ricoh

left click, “Printing Preferences

Choosing Custom Settings:

Choosing Tray Source

Select Media Type and Tray Source (By-Pass)


Paper Type- Ink Jet Plain Paper

Tray Source- By-pass tray

Click User Settings

User Settings

Selecting User Settings

Color Settings – Off

Check- Use Error Diffusion


Click the “Misc” tab the checkPrint as Bitmap

Print as Bitmap

click "Misc" tab the click "Print as Bitmap"

Last click on “OK

Now click on the far right tab “Printer Configuration

configure Printer Configuration

Turn off the "Auto Reduce to Fit..."

Turn off the “Auto Reduce to Fit…”

Deselect the “Auto Reduce to Fit…

Save

Name the Custom Setting "Conde ICC By_Pass"

Go back to the “setup” tab and click Save

Name the Custom Settings “Condé ICC By-Pass

In addition…

Now that we’ve defaulted the By-pass tray there is additional information I believe goes hand and hand with defaulting the by-pass tray as the main paper source. If you don’t already know you can create up to 10 unique paper size settings on the Ricoh drivers. If you are sheet feeding the printer due to having to continuously change paper sizes then this will especially be useful information to know and execute.

How to Create Custom Paper Sizes on the Ricoh:(click for Video)


Create a Custom Paper Size

Printer Configuration- Custom Paper Sizes


Go back to “Printer Configurationand click “Custom Paper Sizes“.

This opens a new Dialog Box:

1. Choose the paper source- By-Pass Tray

2. Give this paper setting a “Name”- for example: Mug11

3. Enter the “Long Edge” size- for example: 9.13

4. Enter the “Short Edge” size- for example: 3.50

5. clickOK“. This will close the Custom Paper dialog box.

"OK" to save and exit out of the Custom Paper Settings

"OK" to save and exit

Now it will be in the paper settings list; under “original size” in the list.

Paper Settings-Original Size List

Paper Settings-Original Size List

As with this custom paper setting, you can create as many as 9 more unique paper size setting. This is one of the many great features to take advantage of with your sublimation printer. Make your printer work for your needs as much as possible. Save time and energy by creating printer settings that fit with production needs and job planning to get the most out of your printer.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Condé Systems, Inc.

Senior Technical Consultant

Vicky Waldrop


Why Should I do a Nozzle Check

October 4th, 2011

If you haven’t asked the question then I am certain it has entered your mind. Condé Support Technicians will ask you, “perform a nozzle check” usually right after the callers ask, “Why is my color off?” A good nozzle check is vital to the color in your images. It is the balance of color and when it is bad it is not possible for print outs to be at its’ peek output capability.

What are the signs that my nozzle check is bad?

Typically, the first signs indicating the nozzle check could be bad are when you have encountered a color shift or you are experiencing some banding in the output/printed images. When this happens it is time to verify that all print heads are firing. How to do this ins in the instructions “How to do a Nozzle check” or our video on “How to do a Nozzle Check” from “CondeTV”.

How do I know if my Nozzle Check is bad?

Know what to look for in the nozzle check. Depending on how many colors/cartridges the printer has should reflect in the nozzle check pattern. An 8 color printer should have 8 blocks of color; a 6 color printer will have 6; a 4 having 4; and so on…

Check for breaks in the pattern and missing color. See example: The image on the top identifies a good pattern of color; the image on the bottom displays gaps in the pattern, which is a problem.

Example

What can I do to correct a bad Nozzle check?

Usually, performing a head cleaning will minimize or correct the breaks or missing blocks which will improve the color and quality of the print outs. If there is no improvements after two or three cleaning there is likely severe clogging or something other than clogging is going on. Get in touch with support for further help and advice for these types of issues.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Condé Systems Inc.

Senior Technical Consultant

Vicky Waldrop


DK3 and Mug11 for full bleed

March 4th, 2011

Pressing mugs can be confusing if we assume they are all pressed the same way with every image. A poor assumption using the same instruction for full bleed as with standard imaging on the mug press will lead to a bad transfer and wasted product. These are errors that will make dips in profit trends.

We have invested well spent time in finding ways to get the perfect result with every mug. Now to let you in on some ways to get you to perfection with pressing all of your 11 oz mugs.

Make sure you have a good mug press…DK3 FYI:

The DK3 has been around for 4 decades and has earned its place in the commercial  mug pressing business. Condé has been supplying customers with the GK3 mug press for over a decade and we believe it is the top of the line in mug presses. Here is why…

Nerd smile The heat element covers more area

Just kidding The design allows for easy mug placement for various mug sizes, including water bottles, steins and many other cylinder shapes.

Flirt female Up to 70 presets (for multiple products), a prepress timer and a user menu.

Adjusting the George Knight DK3 Mug Press

Know the difference of what mug you are using:

Condé sells two types of standard 11 oz mugs. One is MUG11US and the other/s MUG11. You will need to know the press time will vary based on which mug you purchased. Make sure you read the instruction on the product page for each.

Pressing standard images on 11 oz:

Standard images on 11 oz mugs can extend about 1/4 to the top and bottom edges of the mug. The dwell time is about 3.5 mins on MUG11USA and 4.5 mins for MUG11’s at 400 degrees with medium pressure. Pro-spray can be used as an alternative to heat tape. Both sold at Condé.

Pressing full bleed mugs:

The full bleed mugs are the most challenging for transfer. The time may increase up to 6 mins due to the coverage area. After all you will be transferring to the maximum area. To get the best result you will need to trim to the borders of the image. Use Pro-spray as an adhesive. Often, wetting the edges of the transfer will help with adhering to the bottom of the mug. Sometimes the very bottom of the mug/s can be more textured or rippled around the outside diameter. Using the thicker padding (1/8″  vs. a 1/16th” heat conductive rubber pad located around the heat element) and a little more pressure will help with this.

Intro to the George Knight DK3 Mug Press

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Condé Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


Getting Started with Sublimation

December 28th, 2010

If you are just affiliating with Condé System’s, Inc., you might be wondering “where do I begin?”  There are some things we have put into place to help get you started on the right path to dye sublimation. If you are a beginner; just setting up your Condé DyeSub system; or just wanting to be sure you are adequately informed, then I believe this literature can be a beginners check sheet.

First, PartnerNet (PN) registration is a requirement to begin the steps below. If you have not been enlightened about PartnerNet, contact you account manager immediately so the below recommendations/tools are obtainable to you and/or your company.

Preparing your Condé DyeSub System for a setup

Now that I have all my files, what do I do with them?

Because everyone is different, we have provided optional ways to receive instructions for configuring the dye sublimation systems for use with Condé ICC Profiles, to include; SubliJet Inks; ArTainium Inks; or, Chromablast Inks.

What will I need to know/have after I get setup?

Using Condé Web Page

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Conde Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


Sublimation Tip: Program Print Record for PC’s

December 22nd, 2010

Combined with today’s technology and pressures from a society that wants “instant gratification”, we at Condé Systems are inventing short cuts and giving you back some of your valuable time wherever possible, because time is money.  We can reduce the time it takes to find previous print jobs and eliminate spool time so you can get to sublimating quicker. Here is why…

Purpose:

Remembering print jobs

Large jobs can be printed in segments (ex: 100 pcs. at 10 pages at a time)

Save our print jobs so we can reprint the jobs over and over again.

It remembers all specs of the job, like paper size and settings so you don’t have too.

This is how…

How to keep print jobs for reprinting:

Get to the Printer folder…

Start;

Control panel;

Printer faxes or devices and printers;

Properties for Vista and XP; or… Windows 7 folks “printer properties

Advanced and “Keep Printed Documents

Keep Printed Documents

Now that the documents are being saved we can come to our print queue and revisit our printed documents. By selecting a document from the print queue; right click on the desired document and left click on restart. This will cause that job to reprint again as if the repeat was selected in your iTunes or any other recording device.

Selecting a saved or recorded print job

When you are done with a job/s, or it is certain the job  will not be  reprinted for some time, right click on the job; left click on delete to get rid of it from within the print queue. Or… From windows 7; right click on the print job in the queue and press delete on the keyboard to remove it.

What you get…

Benefits Include:

This would be a great feature for save time and effort when you have complex print jobs

When many copies are needed and it would be better to space them out rather than bulk printing.

Saving time is money and we want to keep our client on the successful path to sublimation triumph and attainment.

PC Print Record Video…by David Gross

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Conde Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


Quick Fixes…

October 22nd, 2010

I get a lot of phone calls from people who have an issue that just a simple fix. It’s not always obvious what is going on but just a few mouse clicks and you’re done. I want to point out a few of these issue.

In Corel when you are having problems that “don’t seam to make sense” or if you have accidentally closed a tool and cannot find it to re-open it. One thing that might help would be to reset Corel back to it’s original settings. Just hold down the F8 key while opening Corel. This will reset the program back to the way it was when you first installed it.

Another thing I have found is that people have accidentally changed their default printer and don’t know how to set it back. All you have to do is open your printer list:

In Windows XP            Start – Control Panel – Printers and Faxes

In Windows Vista            Start – Control Panel – Printers

In Windows 7                 Start – Control Panel –Devices and Printers

Next just right click on the printer you want to make your default and select “Set as Default”

A common issue I see on the Ricoh printer happens when people are printing something on Legal or Tabloid paper and the printer is printing the image too small in the center of the page. This is usually caused by the auto reduce feature in the driver. Just open Printing Preferences and look on the Printer Configuration tab. In the bottom left hand corner just uncheck “Reduce Automatically…” (on the GX7000 it is listed as “Auto Reduce”. Don’t forget to go back to the setup tab and reselect “Conde ICC” under Custom Settings.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Condé Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Andy Taylor