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  International: 251-633-5704

DK3 and Mug11 for full bleed

March 4th, 2011

Pressing mugs can be confusing if we assume they are all pressed the same way with every image. A poor assumption using the same instruction for full bleed as with standard imaging on the mug press will lead to a bad transfer and wasted product. These are errors that will make dips in profit trends.

We have invested well spent time in finding ways to get the perfect result with every mug. Now to let you in on some ways to get you to perfection with pressing all of your 11 oz mugs.

Make sure you have a good mug press…DK3 FYI:

The DK3 has been around for 4 decades and has earned its place in the commercial  mug pressing business. Condé has been supplying customers with the GK3 mug press for over a decade and we believe it is the top of the line in mug presses. Here is why…

Nerd smile The heat element covers more area

Just kidding The design allows for easy mug placement for various mug sizes, including water bottles, steins and many other cylinder shapes.

Flirt female Up to 70 presets (for multiple products), a prepress timer and a user menu.

Adjusting the George Knight DK3 Mug Press

Know the difference of what mug you are using:

Condé sells two types of standard 11 oz mugs. One is MUG11US and the other/s MUG11. You will need to know the press time will vary based on which mug you purchased. Make sure you read the instruction on the product page for each.

Pressing standard images on 11 oz:

Standard images on 11 oz mugs can extend about 1/4 to the top and bottom edges of the mug. The dwell time is about 3.5 mins on MUG11USA and 4.5 mins for MUG11’s at 400 degrees with medium pressure. Pro-spray can be used as an alternative to heat tape. Both sold at Condé.

Pressing full bleed mugs:

The full bleed mugs are the most challenging for transfer. The time may increase up to 6 mins due to the coverage area. After all you will be transferring to the maximum area. To get the best result you will need to trim to the borders of the image. Use Pro-spray as an adhesive. Often, wetting the edges of the transfer will help with adhering to the bottom of the mug. Sometimes the very bottom of the mug/s can be more textured or rippled around the outside diameter. Using the thicker padding (1/8″  vs. a 1/16th” heat conductive rubber pad located around the heat element) and a little more pressure will help with this.

Intro to the George Knight DK3 Mug Press

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Condé Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


George Knight Mug Presses vs. some other mug presses…

February 17th, 2011

The DK3 commercial press has been around for over a decade. The DK3 is fully adjustable, accommodating all mugs available on the market. This includes 11 oz, 15 oz, 16 oz mugs & steins. The ability of the press to open extra wide allows for easy and fast loading and unloading of mugs from the press. The clamp assembly can be adjusted for very heavy pressure, allowing for full bleed transfers on even the most demanding mugs. Finally – a mug press that compensates for less than perfectly straight mugs!

George Knight has the winning edge on the heat process because of the engineering specs on their element design.

Rolling on the floor laughing The cylinder is longer and covers up to 5” in height.

Be right back The heating elements will heat faster across the surface of the pressDk3

Smile The padding is easier to replace during preventive maintenance procedures.

The settings a also easy and extremely user friendly. We have videos to follow for setup.  For those folks that just want to set a time, temperature and press this is the press for you!

These are just some of the products that offer for pressing with the DK3. There are additional items that our clients will use with this press. Some of the products require additional padding (heat conductive pad). Those products include some water bottles that have a smaller outside diameter (OD). The additional padding will help make good contact around the surface of the product.

mugs01STEIN

Some other mug presses made in China can be very unreliable and troublesome. The vertical designs place limitations on mug sizes and image placement. The heating elements not as constant and predictable for high quality results as with the George Knight Heat presses.

Manual-Digital-Mug-Press-Machine-Vertical-Mug-Press-Machine-MP4105-Mug-Press-Machine-Iii

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Conde Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


Getting Started with Sublimation

December 28th, 2010

If you are just affiliating with Condé System’s, Inc., you might be wondering “where do I begin?”  There are some things we have put into place to help get you started on the right path to dye sublimation. If you are a beginner; just setting up your Condé DyeSub system; or just wanting to be sure you are adequately informed, then I believe this literature can be a beginners check sheet.

First, PartnerNet (PN) registration is a requirement to begin the steps below. If you have not been enlightened about PartnerNet, contact you account manager immediately so the below recommendations/tools are obtainable to you and/or your company.

Preparing your Condé DyeSub System for a setup

Now that I have all my files, what do I do with them?

Because everyone is different, we have provided optional ways to receive instructions for configuring the dye sublimation systems for use with Condé ICC Profiles, to include; SubliJet Inks; ArTainium Inks; or, Chromablast Inks.

What will I need to know/have after I get setup?

Using Condé Web Page

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Conde Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


Preventative Maintenance

November 9th, 2010

Printing a nozzle check before you start printing for the day will allow you to see if your printer needs any maintenance. If your nozzle check does not print normally, then your prints will not either. Also, printing a nozzle check once a day will help prevent clogs from forming in your print heads. This can be done manually or with the help of a program such as Harvey Head Cleaner.

Another thing that will help keep your Epson printer clear from clogs is to clean the capping station about once a month. Different models have different procedures for this, however, you should be able to find documentation or videos on how this is done for your printer. Just follow the procedures and allow the printer to sit overnight while soaking.

Moisture in your paper can also cause problems with your printer and your prints. If you store your sublimation paper opened and on a shelf where it is susceptible to the elements, moisture can soak into your paper and that can cause paper jams or print quality issues. It is best to store your paper in an airtight container such as a ziplock bag or storage box.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Condé Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Andy Taylor


Porcelain Ornaments

November 8th, 2010

Christmas is around the corner. It’s time to break out the old Christmas tree and decorate for the season. Condé offers a variety of items people will be looking for to decorate for the holidays.

When decorating the tree people like to find new ornaments for many different reasons. Some people like to have a keepsake from each year and others just want to replace. Condé has a complete line of porcelain ornaments for sublimation. These ornaments are a great addition to any tree and with sublimation they can be personalized making them priceless to your customer.

Be sure to follow our sublimation instructions for the best results when making these ornaments. When pressed properly you will get a great looking ornament that will glisten from the lights on the tree.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Condé Systems Inc.
www.Condé.com

Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Andy Taylor


What is Dye Sublimation?

October 15th, 2010

I hear this question a lot both from people calling who are interested in starting their own business and from friends who are just curious about what I do. I even remember asking that question when I first came to work for Condé. Most of the customers I talk to do not fully understand what dye sublimation is. Not to mention the customers that are just getting started in it that do not really understand it at all. If you have a question or need to understand something PLEASE give us a call.

In a nutshell dye sublimation is a process in which the ink converts directly from a solid to a gas from the heat of the press. The gas then transfers from the paper to your substrate. Once the substrate cools your image will have moved from the paper to the final product.

Dye sublimation requires a special ink. Condé sells several printers from both Epson and Ricoh that can be used for sublimation. You cannot use the standard inks that come with the printer. There are several different types of sublimation inks. Each printer has a specific ink or a list of inks that will work with that printer for sublimation. 

Hard substrates such as ceramic, metals and hardboards require a special coating for sublimation. You can’t just pick up tiles at your local hardware store! Polyester does not require a coating however cotton fibers will not accept the sublimation inks. When pressing to fabrics I do highly recommend 100% polyester!

The temperature, pressure and time are all important factors as well. Different substrates heat up at different rates and have very different characteristics. Condé has a lab that tests each item we sell before it is released to the customer. We have ironed out the kinks and have developed a set of instructions that will give you the specific instructions for each item. Our technical support department will also be glad to help our customers with any questions or problems you might have when sublimating.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Condé Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Andy Taylor


Using the Foam Kit and the Teflon Pillow

September 30th, 2010

Clients who sublimate to textile can find this product to be a worthy investment. Here is why: Have you ever sublimated to a t-shirt, raised the press, removed the transfer and found “paper indention’s” indicating the edges of the paper from the heat and pressure during the transfer process? This is unavoidable if you do not use either the foam kit or the Teflon pillow and develop a understanding of how to correctly transfer with these products included in the layers.

Not to mention, those of you who have just given up and excepted the paper lines on fabrics because you thought there is just nothing you can do to remedy this situation. Or, some of you may have purchased all the “bells and whistles” that were recommended for apparel, tried it and still seen the paper creases after sublimating. That’s even more frustrating because there is more invested to produce a flawless product. Maybe I can help change your mind and perfect the end results.

I have seen these lines in my own work and with the appropriate settings we can reduced the visible creases. Even though the teflon pillow is the easiest to maneuver some people have said that the foam kit is the best because it is the softest. With fabrics the softer the better for “meshing”. I will explain:

The adjustment is the same if using the foam or pillow:

  1. Lay either item on the bottom platinum of the press
  2. With no pressure applied at this time, close the press
  3. Get “eye level” with the gap so you can see the edge of the foam between the plates of the closed press.
  4. Turn the dial, closing the gap 9increasing the pressure) until the foam or pillow is compress about ¼ of its’ height.
  5. Lock it in and raise the press. Now introduce our sublimation instructions and the layers and press away.

You can have success by including these layers in your sublimation process if you understand what to do once you have the foam kit and / or teflon pillow in hand and a some guidance about on how to use it. Conde Technicians wants to get the word out on products like these so that they earn there worth. If you have any questions about this or other products give us a call and we will help to get you informed so that you are getting your monies worth from all purchases.

Video:

Using Vapor Foam

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Conde Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


Things that make you go, Hummm…! Color Issues !?!

September 22nd, 2010

Color Issues !?!
Have you ever printed an image perfectly fine one day and the next day printed the same image and the color be off? I have had this happen to me. If you have been in sublimation business for any length of time then most likely you too have experienced a color shift. As for me, a call of this nature to support is a typical day on the job. The good news is we can often quickly diagnose and resolve color issues with just a few simple processes of elimination. These are the primary reasons for a shift in color:

There are more defined methods for color correction and fine tuning color. However, statistically a color shift will most often be due to one or more of these common reasons. When this happens, these troubleshooting guidelines can often get you back in business with minimum down time. For more information on color issues, visit our documents section from the support / PartnerNet web page and look for “Street Smart”, “Color Matching Tool Kit “ and “101 Tips and Tricks”~by David Gross. Conde Technicians are extremely resourceful at resolving color issues on Conde DyeSublimation systems.

In addition, you will find informative videos for configuring color management by the support team at Condé by visiting Conde TV at www.condetv.com, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Conde Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


Understanding Pressure

September 20th, 2010

Have you ever gone through the complete sublimation process onto your chosen product and upon removing the sublimation paper seen “light and dark” places on the intended “master piece”? If so, then you are a victim of “bad pressure”. You may be wondering how to determine the correct pressure for sublimating to Condé products. I have a sure method for determining that. First, you must know some general information about the product you are transferring too. Is the surface smooth? Is the substrate flat, rigid, or curved on the edges? Does the surface have textured areas? What are the layers? Finally, you need to understand the pressure settings on your heat press.

To share my understanding of pressure for sublimation, I can best explain it as “equal distribution of weight / pressure” or “good contact”. Basically, when the press is closed the transfer should be equally dispersed among the entire sublimatable area of the substrate. Prospray and Tape can be helpful for adhering accurate image placement onto the substrate but not evenly transferring the image to the substrate.

Manual presses:

Light Pressure = 1 hand; Closing the press with one hand, (ex: t-shirts).

Medium Pressure = 1 ½ hand; Closing the press requires one hand with help from the other hand.

Heavy Pressure = 2 hands; Closing the press requires both hands.

Very Heavy Pressure = 2 plus some shoulder strength. Closing the press requires both hands and some body weight.

In general, most Condé products are safely transferred to with medium pressure. This would include products that are flat and do not have surface texture or ridges. For example, metals and FRP products are easy in the sense that they do not require layers (ex: felt, nomax, or a heat conductive rubber pad). When sublimating to textured surfaces, usually they are pressed face down and may require medium to heavy pressure to better mesh to the sublimatable area (ex: light switches, slate and neoprene). On occasion there are times very heavy pressure will be required. Very heavy pressure is necessary for sublimating to hard to reach areas that are otherwise left exposed from good contact with the transfer (ex: patches).

Don’t let yourself fall victim of “bad pressure”. Follow these simple guidelines for adjusting pressure and eliminating future product waste. Should you have more questions about sublimation instructions, visit www.conde.com , and then click on “support” where you can download our complete guide for “Sublimation Instructions”. Second, take a tour on www.condetv.com and type key words for videos on sublimating to any of our products.

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Conde Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop


How to recover from ERR (993) on Ricoh DyeSub Systems:

September 17th, 2010

As with all peripherals, climate control is crucial to its’ ability to function efficiently. Consumers can only do so much to keep room temperature maintained. There may be an occasion that Mother Nature will take her course, causing a power outage and a rise in humidity. A change in temperature  can mean “condensation” which can lead to corrosion and extensive damage. The Ricoh DyeSub printer has the ability to to detect moisture in its environment and give warning that vital components could be at risk. If this should happen to your Conde Sublimation System our support technicians have provided some important instructions to reverse further harm and recover from the error.

First, it is important to get your DyeSub system in a stable environment and back to the recommended room temperature . Second, police the equipment for dampness or any obvious condensation. Then follow the “Knowledge Base” ~Ricoh instruction below:

You can dry the printer’s interior by performing the de-condensation procedure. Follow these steps, from your printer Display (LCD).
1. Press the [Menu] key.

2. Press the up or down key to display [Maintenance], and then press the [#Enter] key.

3. Press the up or down key to display [De-condensation], and then press the [#Enter] key.

Three sheets are fed through the printer without anything being printed on them.

4. Switch the printer off and then back on again.

If the error message does not reappear, the printer’s interior has fully dried.
If the error persists, switch the printer off, leave it for an hour, and switch it back on. If this does not solve the problem, contact your sales or service representative.

Conde Technicans have additional instructions that are necessary to clear this error and get your sublimation system back in tip top shape. We have put together a complete instructional video on how to safely clean the feed belt inside the printer using alcohol and a lint free cloth. Please “click” into www.condetv.com to get complete details about this procedure.

In addition, you will find other awesome videos for sublimation and heat transfer by the support team at Condé by visiting Condé TV, Condé Facebook Page and Condé Twitter. Look for more upcoming videos and informative blog entries to be added for successful sublimation and maintaining your Condé DyeSub System. If there is something that you think would be better said in an instructional video or blog posting, then we look forward to hearing your ideas.

Thanks,
Conde Systems Inc.
www.conde.com

Senior Support Technician,
1-800-826-6332
Vicky Waldrop